Since September 28, 2020, the Winnipeg Metropolitan Region has been in the Restricted level of Manitoba’s COVID-19 Pandemic Response System (Orange), requiring mask use in all public spaces.

With climbing case numbers and clusters of community spread, new public health orders were issued for the WMR by the Chief Provincial Public Health Officer on October 19, 2020 and came into effect at 11 p.m. These orders will remain in effect until at least 11 p.m. on Nov. 2, and include some tightened restrictions, as well as some repeals/changes to previously proposed measures. Click here to view a summary of the restrictions.

This order replaces the order issued on Oct. 7, 2020, and includes:

  • a reduction in indoor and outdoor gathering sizes from 10 to 5 (including weddings, funerals, in private households, parties, food courts, etc)
  • retail businesses to reduce capacity to 50 per cent
  • restaurants to limit maximum occupancy to 50 per cent of their usual capacity
  • casinos and bingo halls to be closed
  • the required completion of contact tracing log forms for a variety of organizations
  • and more

This current order may be extended beyond November 2, and additional measures may be implemented depending on outcomes. To view the full order, click here.

  • What does this mean for your business? To access updated info about the Restricted level and recent Public Health orders, click here to view our Pandemic Response Guide.
  • What is the Winnipeg Metropolitan Region? The WMR is comprised of the City of Winnipeg, plus the following areas outside of the capital region:
    • City of Selkirk;
    • Town of Stonewall;
    • Rural Municipality (RM) of Cartier;
    • RM of Headingley;
    • RM of Macdonald;
    • RM of Ritchot;
    • RM of Rockwood;
    • RM of Rosser;
    • RM of Springfield;
    • RM of St. Andrews;
    • RM of St. Clements;
    • RM of St. François Xavier;
    • RM of Taché;
    • RM of West St. Paul;
    • RM of East St. Paul;
    • Town of Niverville; and
    • Village of Dunnottar.
  • What is a “public space”? A public space is any location to which the general public has access. This includes (but is not limited to): retail, restaurants, libraries, common areas of a residential building, private clubs, enclosed pedestrian walkways, areas of a business that greet customers, clinics, etc.
  • Are there exceptions to mask use requirements? Yes, exceptions may include: children under 5; certain medical conditions (including breathing or cognitive difficulties or a disability that prevents them from safely wearing a mask); persons who are unable to put on or remove a mask without assistance. Additionally, masks can be temporarily removed for the purpose of: receiving a service that requires removal of the mask, actively engaging in an athletic activity, consuming food/drink, an emergency/medical purpose, establishing identity. Also, there will likely be an exception for employees if they are located behind a non-permeable physical barrier (e.g. plexiglass).
  • Are there expectations for businesses to enforce the Public Health orders? How does a business deal with a client who refuses to wear a mask? The operator of an indoor public place must ensure that every person who is not wearing a mask is reminded to do so as soon as practicable. We recommend posting clearly visible signage in multiple locations especially at entrances that reminds patrons of the rules. We do not expect businesses or their employees to put themselves in any situations of enforcement that could be risky to their own safety. For helpful information about how to engage safely with customers who refuse to wear a mask, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) has produced the following resources: Limiting Workplace Violence Associated with COVID-19 Prevention Policies in Retail and Services Businesses
  • Are there materials I can use to communicate changes with my customers? Yes, the WRHA has produced materials including posters you can affix in your premises and a sample log.